13th March

The tragic history of our Irish Mother and Baby homes has been headline news for some time. I wrote the following related reflections for this week’s parish newsletter.

pro-lifePro-Life: A recent article from the Irish Catholic by David Quinn is entitled ‘How abortion disproportionately targets the disabled’ (and the least of Jesus’ brethren – Matt 25:40). It can be downloaded and viewed in the Misc17 folder on http://www.tiny.cc/DCLMA. Eg. Iceland prides itself in being 100% Down Syndrome free!

Citizens Assembly recently heard powerful testimony from Dr Levatino, ex-abortionist who talked about what the abortion procedure does to the unborn baby. His presentation is at http://www.tiny.cc/17PLA. Also Rebecca Kiessling, a mother and attorney, who was conceived in rape, has addressed the Assembly to ask if she deserved the death penalty for the crime of a rapist. Her testimony is on http://www.tiny.cc/17PLB.

Recently we have been hearing the sorry accounts of how unwanted children of the near past have been treated by Irish society and particularly in Mother and Baby homes: forced adoptions, high mortality rates, burials in unmarked and mass graves, being treated as second class citizens, etc. What about the fate of unwanted children today? One common solution is their deliberate and mass killing by abortion. Some 180,000 have perished in foreign abortion clinics since the late 1960s; about 4,000 are killed annually. Their remains are given far less dignity than burial in unmarked graves (without going into the sorry details!). Now the powers that be in politics and media want to legalise this killing in our own country by removing the Eight Amendment. When something is legalised, it becomes among other things more culturally acceptable. Too bad that these powers that be cant see that unwanted babies in the womb might be worth a second class status that would at least ensure their right to life.

###########################################################

If you have further interest in this, the following article from Irish Catholic is worth reading. It can be downloaded and viewed through this link:  https://1drv.ms/b/s!Alb1xoBeKkVogkXEwHKsedagjAAz . It makes a number of points about:

  • The high mortality rates in such homes was related to poverty and disease.
  • The details of the internments within the underground tanks/structures is unknown. It is possible that regardless of their previous use, these structures were rededicated as burial crypts. There is no evidence that the internments were done without respect.
  • The Irish cultural values of the time were largely based on Victorian morality and respectability.
Advertisements