7th April

Had another routine chemotherapy clinic today. As the nurse was about to take blood, I asked her if she knew how many nurses it took to change a lightbulb. She said “Is is a nice joke?” I said it’s not too bad: “Nurses don’t change bulbs – doctor has been called!” I was at pains that it was a nurse that told me that in the first place. As it happened, when she put the needle in first time, no blood came out and she had to try the other arm. As she was re-trying, she said: “NO jokes this time!” When she was finished I told her how many junior doctors it takes to change a lightbulb: None, nurse has been called! (That should have balanced things out.)

In today’s Midday Reading from the Divine Office we had an excerpt from Isaiah’s Song of God’s Suffering Servant. This entire poem is the first reading in the Good Friday Passion Liturgy and is said to be the primary Old Testament prophesy of Jesus’ messianic mission. Read this slowly and prayerfully.

passion of the Christ

And yet ours were the sufferings he bore, ours the sorrows he carried. But we, we thought of him as someone punished, struck by God, and brought low. Yet he was pierced through for our faults, crushed for our sins. On him lies a punishment that brings us peace, and through his wounds we are healed. (Isaiah 53:4-5)

Turn your face away from my sins

– and wipe out all my transgressions.

################################################################

During breakfast I came across an article in the National Catholic Register about Cardinal Sarah and his latest article about the importance of personal silence. To quote the article “the African cardinal explains how ordinary Catholics can become contemplatives in the world, and he warns that those who live under the “dictatorship of noise” will shut out the “humble voice” of God.” If you are interested in the full article, click on this link: http://www.ncregister.com/daily-news/cardinal-robert-sarah-discusses-the-sublimity-of-silence

Advertisements